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Personality:

Are you propaganda proof?

Think you’re not susceptible to propaganda? Think again. Propaganda producers know you a lot better than you think — your likes and dislikes, your hopes and fears. Take our short quiz to reveal how propaganda makers could target you and what steps you can take to prevent it.

Is there a target on your back?
Take our quiz to reveal:
Let's get started!

Introduction

Propaganda makers think about a lot more than just politics and protest. Their job relies on knowing you better than you know yourself: your likes and dislikes, hopes and fears.

Pick your preferences — from food to fashion — to reveal how you see the world... and how propaganda makers could target YOU.

Pick a way to spend your day off:

Curling up with a good book or TV show at home. Eating brunch at the hottest new restaurant, then going to a show. Volunteering for a cause you feel passionate about. Cheering on your favorite sports team.

Pick a dessert:

Classic milk and cookies A super-indulgent milkshake Fair-trade chocolate truffles Your hometown’s famous pie

Pick a TV show:

A reality show about how to declutter your life A scandalous prime-time soap A tear-jerking drama A political talk show — as long as you agree with the host

Pick an athletic event:

A soccer match: the purest sport A ninja obstacle course: the more extreme, the better A fundraising run: exercise with a purpose A rivalry showdown: time for superfans to shine

Pick a room:

Clean lines, no clutter Ornate and impressive Cozy and eclectic A tribute to your friends and loved ones

Pick a vacation:

A trip to a quaint seaside town A destination with big attractions and lots of entertainment options A service trip to help an impoverished community abroad A trip to visit beloved family or friends

Pick a color or pattern:

Pick a musical event:

A solo artist at a small venue A multistage music festival A charity concert A musical revue featuring your favorite hits

Pick a view:

Pick a hobby:

Adult coloring books Skydiving Community service projects Playing on a softball team

Pick an animal:

Pick a fashion statement:

Keep it classic: jeans and a white tee Funky footwear: designer sneakers or heels Sustainable fashion: an organic cotton shirt or dress Fan fashion: a jersey of your favorite team

Your Disin.fo Propaganda Profile Quiz Results

Straightforward & Direct

You see the heart of the issue and aren’t easily distracted by complicated claims or fancy footwork. You like your arguments simple and classic.

First the good news! You have an amazing strength that protects you from certain types of propaganda. But the bad news is that you've also got a weakness that makes you more susceptible to other types of propaganda. Learn more about your strengths and weaknesses below and then find out how to make yourself #propagandaproof.

Strength:

Exaggeration

You’re great at spotting propaganda that relies on exaggeration to build up its cause and show off its strength.

Learn more

Weakness:

Simplification

Propaganda creators could target you using simplification because it takes advantage of your dislike of complexity and clutter.

Learn more

Let the world know you’re on your way to being #propagandaproof! Share your results and see how you stack up against your friends and family.

Not the results you were expecting? Take the quiz again.

Also on Disin.fo:

About

Disinformation Nation is an education project of the Freedom Forum Institute, a nonpartisan organization headquartered in Washington, D.C., that fosters First Amendment freedoms for all.

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Simplification

Introduction

Propaganda reduces complicated issues to basic ideas and packages them with catchy slogans and images. Check out these real-world examples of simplification at work.

Go to extremes!

Here, Nazi Germany’s press is bloody-dagger-level bad. The U.S. press, on the other hand, is all good: free and filling papers with hard news. But the reality for the American side was a bit more complicated, as the military controlled the publication of war news and newspapers were expected to promote an encouraging view of the fighting.

Learn more about this example at NewseumED.org.

A little bit of logic leads to an enormous leap!

This Facebook post, created by Russian operatives, attempts to create a connection between two tragic situations in order to stoke outrage. But just because two things have something in common — in this case, suffering children — doesn’t mean they’re linked.

Learn more about this example at NewseumED.org.

Who needs lies?!

Propaganda doesn’t have to include outright lies to be misleading; ignoring facts and counterarguments that contradict its message can also skew its representation of reality. The left-wing activist page Occupy Democrats makes the economic performance of President Donald Trump and other Republican presidents look bad, but it only paints part of the picture.

Learn more about this example at NewseumED.org.

Who could support that!?

Propagandists know it’s easier for people to hate the other side when opponents’ positions are twisted into something nobody could realistically stand behind. Of course people are more likely to oppose U.S. involvement in Syria if the alternative means “killing the innocent” and opposing peace.

Learn more about this example at NewseumED.org.

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Exaggeration

Introduction

Propaganda paints its cause as unbeatable, without flaws or weaknesses. Check out these real-world examples of exaggeration at work.

Need a miracle?

Propagandists want you to think they can help solve all your problems if you support their cause or change your behavior the way they want. Here, a bestselling author promises outlandish health outcomes can come from drinking 16 ounces of celery juice daily … and joining his bandwagon of supporters.

Learn more about this example at NewseumED.org.

Need trust and respect? Borrow it!

Propagandists often hitch their cause to popular ideas to help build support for their own message. This civil-rights-era, anti-communist paper piggybacks off patriotism, with an American flag and rugged Revolutionary-era fighter in its masthead, and a name that harkens back to the famous pamphlet that convinced many colonists to support the fight for independence.

Learn more about this example at NewseumED.org.

Who doesn’t want success?

Propagandists know this, and will use the promise of positive consequences to attract support for their cause, whether it’s dastardly or beneficial. Here a U.S. government agency publicizes low-cost or no-cost health insurance by showing the kids are all smiles when their dental visits are covered.

Learn more about this example at NewseumED.org.

Make a power play!

Propagandists like to portray their cause as popular, well-respected, and powerful. Here the Communist Party of America emphasizes how “invincible” it is despite a recent government crackdown. It claims that most U.S. workers already support the movement … so why not you, too?

Learn more about this example at NewseumED.org.

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Exploitation

Introduction

Propaganda uses emotional messages to play on universal weaknesses, fears and desires. Check out these real-world examples of exploitation at work.

Be very afraid!

Propaganda often uses fear to grab a reader’s attention. This graphic “warns” of dangers lurking inside the “swine flu” vaccine, from toxins to the risk of serious illness or even death. But its claims are taken out of context, exaggerated, or just plain false.

Learn more about this example at NewseumED.org.

Flattery will get you everywhere!

Propagandists know that a positive message has its place. In this case, honoring the bravery of servicemen and women helps open the door for other Russian-created messages designed to sow political discord in the U.S.

Learn more about this example at NewseumED.org.

Lady Liberty weeps for dead children!

Propagandists use shocking content to override reason with emotion. The Iraqi army hoped to turn American troops against the Gulf War by claiming their actions would kill innocent women and children and make “Liberty Stadium” cry.

Learn more about this example at NewseumED.org.

Don’t get left behind!

Whether the cause is secular or sacred, using deadlines and peer pressure can compel people to make decisions. Would you want to be stuck on earth after all the true believers entered heaven? This imitation newspaper makes it sound like a pretty rotten fate.

Learn more about this example at NewseumED.org.

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Division

Introduction

Propaganda works to separate “us” versus “them,” broadening divisions between different people, groups and ideas. Check out these real-world examples of division at work.

It’s a massacre!

Propagandists like to depict opposing groups as heroes and villains. In this engraving, American colonists are depicted as innocent victims, and the redcoats are merciless killers. The Boston Massacre was not actually so simple, but this story is far more likely to gin up support for revolution!

Learn more about this example at NewseumED.org.

Would you side with Satan?

Propagandists push us to take sides by creating scenarios where there is only one correct choice. This Facebook post depicts Satan and Jesus arm wrestling, with Satan supporting Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton. The choice is clear!

Learn more about this example at NewseumED.org.

I want to be on their side!

Propagandists use celebrities and respected figures to connect people to their message. Here, they highlight a police officer who derides Black Lives Matter, borrowing his sway as an authority figure to build support for their own goal: sowing division and discord.

Learn more about this example at NewseumED.org.

That sounds dangerous!

Propagandists stereotype entire groups of people to devalue and dehumanize them. This makes it easier to write them off as dangerous and unworthy of aid or understanding. Here, undocumented migrants are “invaders” threatening the United States.

Learn more about this example at NewseumED.org.

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